Our Gospel this morning is from Matthew,  Chapter 9 verse 35 to Chapter 10 verse 8

 

The Workers Are Few

 

35 Jesus went through all the towns and villages, teaching in their synagogues, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom and healing every disease and sickness. 

 

36 When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. 

 

37 Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. 

 

38 Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.

 

Jesus Sends Out the Twelve

 

10 Jesus called his twelve disciples to him and gave them authority to drive out impure spirits and to heal every disease and sickness.

 

These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (who is called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; 

 

Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus; 

 

Simon the Zealot and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him.

 

These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Do not go among the Gentiles or enter any town of the Samaritans. 

 

Go rather to the lost sheep of Israel! 

 

As you go, proclaim this message: ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’ 

 

Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons. Freely you have received; freely give.

 

This is the Gospel of the Lord

 

Good morning. The intention was to record in Akeley Churchyard, but the wind was such we have had to move back to Maids Moreton

 

Let us first pray

 

Lord we thank you for bringing us together to worship you this morning.

 

Help us to listen and to learn from your word and to be encouraged by it to face with confidence the challenges that still lie before us.

 

Although physically apart, bring us ever closer into your family

 

In Jesus name we pray.

 

Amen 

 

As I was assembling my ideas for today I naturally thought about Covid 19. We have given a fancy name to it — a pandemic — but in earlier times we would have called it a plague. 

 

A plague can be defined as an epidemic disease causing a high rate of mortality : 

 

They can affect humans, animals or plant life.

 

Plagues are nothing new, but one difference is that now the we have it placed before us by the media all the time. Mostly from a negative point of view. 

 

How are you coping with Covid 19? It is hard isn’t it?

Separated from family and friends.

Young people not knowing how their educational opportunities will pan out or if they will find employment.

Vast numbers of people potentially out of work.

Parents anxious about there prospects, and how they will support their families 

Will things like sport, entertainment, restaurants, pubs, cafes, ever be the same. Can we go on holiday again?  When can we meet collectively in our churches again?

 

The list of negatives is endless.

 

But so are the positives but we only tend to find those in the bottom corner of an inside page in the newspaper.

 

Traffic and thus pollution greatly reduced

Time to stop and enjoy nature

Parents able to spend time with their kids!

Being able to step out of the rat race

The quiet

Time to reflect on what is really important in our lives.

 

One of the best things that has happened is that so many more people are helping others.Some doing big things but most showing little acts of human kindness to someone else. Do you notice how many more people acknowledge you as you pass. Showing the need for human contact!

 

Even as christians many of us have got out of the habit of such acts, being too self centred, too concerned about our own lives, and rather less about the charge that Jesus Christ has given us.

 

And so todays readings are a timely reminder 

 

Go rather to the lost sheep of Israel. 

 

As you go, proclaim this message: ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’ 

 

Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons. Freely you have received; freely give.

 

We may not have the medical skills to heal the medical condition, Covid 19, but I foresee the greater medium to long term need being for the mental health of those around us. There we can help by our contact, by giving our time to listening to and reassuring people.

 

37 Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few.

 

This Gospel  passage describes a pivotal moment in Jesus ministry. Up until now,Mathew’s Gospel has all been about Jesus’ personal ministry. Jesus had been traveling all throughout Galilee, teaching and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom. Not only that, he’d been healing the sick, giving sight to the blind and raising the dead back to life.

 

Can you imagine what it would have been like to see this? It would have been extraordinary. 

 

But as we move into In Matthew chapter 10:1 we read, “Jesus called his twelve disciples to him and gave them authority to drive out evil spirits and to heal every disease and sickness.” 

 

We are right at the moment when Jesus makes the switch from preaching and teaching and healing himself, to commissioning his disciples to go out to preach and teach and heal. 

This is the moment when Jesus commissions his followers to do what he’s doing. So what does this tell us? It tells us that whatever happens, if we claim to be a follower of Jesus then we are charged with exercising the same type of ministry that Jesus had. 

 

We read in verse 36, “When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them.” 

 

The compassion of Jesus is a theme that keeps coming up in the book of Matthew.

because Compassion is at the heart of Jesus.

 

You could think that the reason for that compassion would be because of the sicknesses that he’s encountered everywhere he goes.That is certainly worth his compassion. 

 

But what moves Jesus here isn’t the physical illnesses that he’s encountered. Verse 36 says, “When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.” 

 

What moved Jesus was the great spiritual need of the people. Their lives had no centre, their existence seemed aimless, and their whole experience was one of futility. How many of us, if we are honest have experienced such moments in our Covid lockdown?

 

If we are to serve like Jesus served, we must have a heart that is like the heart of Jesus. This means that we must have compassion for those we encounter who have not yet found the great Shepherd Jesus Christ. It means that we look around us and see people the way Jesus does, and feel compassion for them the way that he does.

 

As we read this passage today, we, like the disciples,  are given something to believe and then something to do.

 

First, we’re given something to believe. Jesus says in verse 37, “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few.” 

 

He tells us is that the harvest is ready. People are ready to receive the good news of the kingdom. The problem isn’t that people are unready to receive the good news; the problem is that we aren’t ready to tell them. 

 

One of our greatest challenges as Christians is that we can believe  that people aren’t interested, that it’s a waste of time to tell them. Jesus tells us that is not right.They are ready to hear. This is what he tells us to believe. Do you believe it?

 

Then he gives us something to do about it. 

 

You would expect Jesus to say, “ Get out there and tell them!” But that’s not what he says. Surprisingly, he says, “Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.” Jesus tells us to pray first instead of doing something? 

 

In the very next chapter, remember, he’s going to instruct his twelve disciples, and then send them out to preach and teach and do the things that he’s done. 

 

But he knows that before any can have the ministry that he has, they must have the same prayerful reliance on the Father that he does. Before we can have the compassion of Jesus, we must have the connection with the Father that Jesus has.

 

It’s one thing for us to go and do. It’s another thing altogether to plead with God that he would raise up people — either through conversion or growth — who are ready to go; to pray that God would give them a spirit for the work, call them to it, and give them wisdom and success.

 

When I think of the cross and I see the Shepherd willingly lay down his life for me so that I could become one of his sheep I know the least I can do is pray for others.

 

And when we start to believe that the harvest is plentiful and pray that he would send out workers, you never know if we may become the answer to our own prayers — that we could be the workers commissioned by the Lord of the harvest himself. 

 

What an inspiring thought!

 

Let us pray!

 

Lord, your harvest is your love;

A love sown in the hearts of all people;

Love that spreads out like the branches of a great tree covering all who seek its shelter;

Love that inspires and that recreates;

Love that is planted in the weak and the weary, the sick and the dying and those who spend their life in fear.

 

The harvest of your love is the life that reaches  to the sunlight of resurrection through the weeds of sin and death.

 

Lord, nurture our days with your love, water our souls with the dew of forgiveness, that the harvest of our lives may be your joy.

 

Amen